Reticulated Giraffe

Vulnerable

Djibouto is a 4-year-old male


Scientific name : Giraffa reticulata

Where do they live?

They live in the north and northeast of Kenya, in southern Somalia and southern Ethiopia.

Did you know?

Several species of giraffes?
It has been widely recognised that there is a single species of giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis, and nine sub-species. However, during the last ten years, some research has shown that there are in fact four distinct species of giraffes and five sub-species. The four species and their sub-species live in geographically distinct areas throughout Africa. However, this research has not yet been officially accepted, and several studies are underway to solve this mystery.

Reticulated giraffes are present to a limited extent in the north and northeast of Kenya and small populations live in southern Somalia and southern Ethiopia. There are an estimated 8,700 individuals of this giraffe sub-species in the wild, a drastic decline considering that its population was approximately 37,000 just 3 generations ago. It would seem however that the species is increasing in numbers in northern Kenya thanks to the involvement of local populations and the reserves.
It is easy to see why this species is called "reticulated giraffe": its spots are an intense combination of orange and brown outlined by a striking network of white lines. Its spotted coat continues on the entire length of its legs.

Height

Up to 6 meters tall.

Weight

Up to 1.5 tonnes.

Maximum speed

55 km/h.

Life expectancy

28 years in captivity.

Gestation period

457 days.

Keep up hope

In January 2016, thanks to donations collected on World Giraffe Day launched by the GCF (the Giraffe Conservation Foundation), 18 Rothschild's giraffes from northern Uganda crossed the Nile River to reach the southern part of Murchison National Park to increase genetic diversity and protect the animals. During this operation, blood samples were taken and 5 giraffes were outfitted with GPS collars to track their adaptation and their behaviour in their new environment.